Tuesday

Death of Great Grandmother Margarethe Wörtche Schwebel 1872-1900

home birth  with the midwife 1800's
Why did great grandmother Margarethe die? This is a sad question we most likely will never have the answer to. She was only 27 years old. Twelve weeks earlier she had given birth to her third child, a healthy little girl that actually lived to adulthood. Puerperal (childbed) fever was a common cause of death of women having babies as antibiotics had not yet been invented and many doctors still did not believe in or strictly adhere to the practice of handwashing. Her baby, Margaret Elisabeth, however was delivered not in Darmstadt but Reinheim, most likely at home by a midwife or family member. Home births had a much lower rate of puerperal fever than did hospital births. Women who died from puerperal fever also generally died in the first few weeks after giving birth. Margarethe died 3 months after her daughter's birth.



Why also did she die in Darmstadt? I would doubt that a healthy mother would leave a child so young or herself care to travel for whatever reason so soon after delivery. I know that Darmstadt had the closest hospital therefore I find it most logical that Margarethe, ill or injured, traveled to Darmstadt hospital for advanced medical care. Knowing medically what we do now I still think it possible that the birth of her child somehow contributed to her death. Pulmonary embolism? Infection? Hemorrhage?


Why? We will never know. The record of her death doesn't say.





Ruhe in Frieden
great grandmother
Margarethe Wörtche Schwebel
b: 7 July 1872 Reinheim, Dieberg, Hesse, Germany
d: 8 May 1900 Darmstadt, Dieberg, Hesse, Germany






***click on document to enlarge for easier reading***

Monday

Birth Record of Grandmother Elisabeth Schwebel 1897-1938

Grandmother Elisabeth's birth record was found the same way as grandfathers was...by going through the 1897 Reinheim, Hesse birth records, of the year 1897, one by one. It seems she was initially named Elise while future records all showed various versions of Elisabeth. There are many variations and diminutives of Elisabeth used in Germany, one being Elise. That should have occurred to me before now.

Hesse Germany Births 1851-1901, accessed 5 Feb 2018 Ancestry.com: 
Geburtenregister und Namensverzeichnisse. Hessisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, Wiesbaden, 
Deutschland: Personenstandsregister Geburtsregister; Signatur: 902; Laufende Nummer: 918


Elise was the second of three children born to Friedrich Schwebel and Margarethe Wörtche.

Paternal Grandmother
Elise Schwebel
b: 25 May 1897 Reinheim, Hesse, Germany
d: 20 August 1938 Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany


***click on document to enlarge for easier reading***

Birth Record of Grandfather Georg Ludwig Feick 1887-1948

I always knew the birth date of my husband's grandfather. My father in law had stated the birthdate of his parents on documentation he had filled out when immigrating to the U.S.. I also had found grandfather Ludwig's official certificate of marriage and death which stated his year of birth. But for some time Ludwig's birth record eluded me. Then I found it. I would guess the old German script confused the transcriber (it IS really tough for the English speaker). One day I just went through the 1887 Groß-Bieberau book of births page by page. Here is Grandpa Feick or Frick?

Hesse Germany Births 1851-1901, accessed 5 Feb 2018 Ancestry.com: 
Geburtenregister und Namensverzeichnisse. Hessisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, Wiesbaden, 
Deutschland: Personenstandsregister Geburtsregister; Signatur: 902; Laufende Nummer: 248

Georg Ludwig was the second of four boys born to Johann Friedrich Feick and Marie Katharine Böck of  Groß-Bieberau, Hesse Germany


Paternal Grandfather
Georg Ludwig Feick
b: 3 November 1887 Groß-Bieberau, Hesse, Germany
d: 9 November 1948 Groß-Bieberau, Hesse, Germany


***click on document to enlarge for easier reading***

Saturday

Feick and Schwebel, Schwebel and Feick

My hubby's grandfather was a Feick and his grandmother was a Schwebel. Both families have been in the Groß-Bieberau area for centuries and seeing that it is really not so large an area (4,500 population of Groß-Bieberau today) it is inevitable that Feicks and Schwebels should intermarry....repeated times. The first instance, I discovered this was while researching hubby's 3rd great grandfather, Johan Wilhelm Schwebel 1777-1866. who married Elisabeth Margaretha Feick 1781-1840. Elisabeth was already listed in the family tree as a fourth great aunt and now she is also a third great grandmother! There are many Feicks marrying Schwebels. In fact many other surnames I find popping up over and over. It boggles the mind to think how many possible inter marriages there are. That's why Walter Feick is not only my husband's father but he is also my husband's

fourth cousin twice removed
fifth cousin
sixth cousin once removed
sixth cousin twice removed X2
seventh cousin X2
seventh cousin once removed X4
seventh cousin twice removed
seventh cousin three times removed X2
and on and on and on up to twelfth cousin and would be more but Groß-Bieberau didn't have church records before that time.

This is the story however all over Medieval Europe when the population was small and people just didn't have the opportunity to move about as much as today. On the positive side I never noticed any family members who looked like the kid in Deliverence (do we hear banjos playing?).

H.G.Wells, Albert Einstein, Edgar Allen Poe, and most of the royalty of Europe married their cousins so I guess we are in good company. Besides, anthropologists believe that everyone on earth is at most our 40th cousin. Oh well. It makes the family tree rather confusing at times though doesn't it?




a Feick by marriage only (although my Scandinavian ancestors dallied with their kin also),